Tag: anecdotes

Hospital Window

Two men, both seriously ill, occupied the same hospital room. One man was allowed to sit up in his bed for an hour each afternoon to help drain the fluid from his lungs. His bed was next to the room’s only window. The other man had to spend all his time flat on his back. The men talked for hours on end. They spoke of their wives and families, their homes, their jobs, their involvement in the military service, where they had been on vacation.
Every afternoon when the man in the bed by the window could sit up, he would pass the time by describing to his roommate all the things he could see outside the window.
The man in the other bed began to live for those one hour periods where his world would be broadened and enlivened by all the activity and color of the world outside.
The window overlooked a park with a lovely lake. Ducks and swans played on the water while children sailed their model boats. Young lovers walked arm in arm amidst flowers of every color and a fine view of the city skyline could be seen in the distance.
As the man by the window described all this in exquisite detail, the man on the other side of the room would close his eyes and imagine the picturesque scene.
One warm afternoon the man by the window described a parade passing by.
Although the other man couldn’t hear the band – he could see it. In his mind’s eye as the gentleman by th! e window portrayed it with descriptive words.
Days and weeks passed.
One morning, the day nurse arrived to bring water for their baths only to find the lifeless body of the man by the window, who had died peacefully in his sleep. She was saddened and called the hospital attendants to take the body away.
As soon as it seemed appropriate, the other man asked if he could be moved next to the window. The nurse was happy to make the switch, and after making sure he was comfortable, she left him alone.
Slowly, painfully, he propped himself up on one elbow to take his first look at the real world outside.
He strained to slowly turn to look out the window beside the bed.
It faced a blank wall. The man asked the nurse what could have compelled his deceased roommate who had described such wonderful things outside this window
The nurse responded that the man was blind and could not even see the wall.
She said, “Perhaps he just wanted to encourage you.”
Be the encourager.. Lift others

Gospel doesn’t promote religion

​Somebody once asked a Christian friend, “I can’t understand you Christians because India is the home of many religions that it is an exceedingly religious country .Why then do you introduce yet another religion and add to the confusion? Surely, India has enough religions.”
The *Christian* friend answered, “Friend, I’m *not interested in religion*, but I’m *deeply interested in the Gospel*. I would not walk across the streets for religion, but I’m willing to go around the world for the sake of the Gospel. There is a difference between the two.”
*Religion is man made; the Gospel is God given*,
Religion is what man does for God; the Gospel is what God has done for man,
Religion is man’s search for God; the *Gospel* is God’s search for man,
Religion is man trying to climb the ladder of his own self-righteousness, with the hope of meeting God at the topmost rung; the Gospel is God coming down the ladder of the incarnation of Jesus Christ and meeting us as sinners at the lowest rung (forming the steps of a ladder),
*Religion is good views; the Gospel is good news*.
Religion is good advice; the Gospel is glorious announcement.
Religion takes a man leaves him as he is; the Gospel takes a man as he is and makes him what he ought to be.
Religion ends in an outer reformation; the Gospel ends in an inner *transformation*.
Religion white washes; the Gospel washes white.
Religion often becomes a farce; the Gospel is always a force, the power of God unto salvation to everyone who believes.
*There are many religions, but only one Gospel.*

Never Give UP ••°°••

To Build a Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge that spans the river tying Manhattan Island to Brooklyn is truly a miracle bridge. In 1863, a creative engineer named John Roebling was inspired by an idea for this spectacular bridge. However, bridge-building experts throughout the world told him to forget it; it could not be done.

Roebling convinced his son, Washington, who was a young upand coming engineer, that the bridge could be built. The two of them developed the concepts of how it could be accomplished and how the obstacles could be overcome. With un harnessed excitement and inspiration, they hired their crew and began to build their dream bridge.

The project was only a few months under construction when a tragic accident on the site took the life of John Roebling and severely injured his son, Washington. Washington was left with permanent brain damage and was unable to talk or walk. Everyone felt that the project would have to be scrapped since the Roeblings were the only ones who knew how the bridge could be built.

Even though Washington was unable to move or talk, his mind was as sharp as ever, and he still had a burning desire to complete the bridge. An idea hit him as he lay in his hospital bed, and he developed a code for communication. All he could move was one finger, so he touched the arm of his wife with that finger, tapping out the code to communicate to her what to tell the engineers who were building the bridge. For thirteen years, Washington tapped out his instructions with his finger until the spectacular Brooklyn Bridge was finally completed.